Mais les yeux sont aveugles

You never know.

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glowcloud:

stop acting like women’s internalized misogyny is bad as men’s misogyny thanks so much

If you have any doubt that the hashtag is a frighteningly powerful tool in our modern vocabulary, imagine a person you care about texting you that song’s title line out of the blue: “You’re beautiful.” Now think of the same person texting, “You’re #beautiful.” The second one is jokey, ironic, distant—and hey, maybe that’s what that person was going for. But it also hammers home that point that the internet too often asserts: You’re not as original as you once thought. “Beautiful” is analog, unquantifiable, one-in-a-million. #Beautiful, on the other hand, is crowded terrain. Ten more people have just tweeted about something or someone #beautiful since you started reading this sentence.
As more and more of our daily interactions become text-based — people preferring texting to phone calls, workplaces that rely heavily email and instant messaging—we’re developing ways to stretch our written language so it can communicate more nuance, so we can tell people what we mean without accidentally leading them on or pissing them off. Periods have become more forceful, commas less essential, and over the last few years, the hashtag has morphed into something resembling the fabled sarcasm font—the official keystroke of irony. Putting a hashtag in front of something you text, email, or IM to someone is a sly way of saying “I’m joking,” or maybe more accurately, “I mean this and I don’t at the same time.”

The #Art of the Hashtag

Thanks to Twitter, the hashtag has become an important linguistic shortcut. But while everyone from Robin Thicke to Beyoncé has used the symbol as part of their art, only a few have truly taken advantage of its culture-jamming possibilities. (via @pitchforkmedia)

(Source: npr)

we-are-starting-at-the-end:

Pop punk songs make you want to start a fucking riot or leave you crying on the floor there is no in between 

"I want you to move to California for yourself"
wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.
In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.
We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.
When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU
pdlcomics:

Monster

whitekidniall:

GUYS COLORED BRAS ARE NOW BANNED IN MY VOLLEYBALL TEAM BC YOU CAN KINDA SEE THEM THROUGH THE SHIRT AND OUR MALE COACHES DON’T FIND IT ACCEPTABLE BC IT’S DISTRACTING WHY ARE THEY OVERSEXUALIZING BRAS ON UNDERAGE GIRLS THEY’RE FUCKING BRAS WHY DO I HAVE TO BE TOLD WHAT TYPE OF FUCKING UNDERGARMENTS TO USE I’M SORRY I DIDN’T PAY CLOSER ATTENTION TO WHAT EVERYONE WAS TALKING ABOUT WHERE THE FUCK DO I SIGN UP FOR THE WHOLE FEMINIST MOVEMENT THING AND SHIT OH MY GO D